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Will the fire funding "fix" actually fix anything?

Low severity fire.

Congress passed a spending bill last week after a month of negotiations produced a $1.3 trillion budget that will keep the federal government open for – gasp – a whole six months. The bill almost failed to become law after a whirlwind few hours that had President Trump threatening a veto, only to reverse himself, sign the bill, and pledge to never let another bill like it pass again.

Where we go from here...

I’m not sure if I have ever been more shocked than I was yesterday when I heard the verdict in the trial of the seven militants who staged an armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Like you, I was left wondering how a band of bullies who filmed themselves trying to provoke a bloody showdown with law enforcement, destroying public property, and desecrating Native American artifacts could be found not guilty?

Wilderness Area of the Week - Copper Salmon

Tucked away in the northwest corner of the Siskiyou National Forest, 11 miles east of Port Orford on the Elk River, lies a 13,700-acre gem. Adjacent to the east boundary of Grassy Knob Wilderness, this natural wonder, known as Copper Salmon, includes the North and South Forks of Elk River. The congressional bill that designated Copper Salmon as a protected wilderness area was signed by President Obama in March of 2009, making it one of Oregon’s newest protected areas.

The loss of a hero

Brief statement on the untimely passing of Oregon Wild staffer, and wildlands hero, Tim Lillebo, and information about his memorial.

Statement from Oregon Wild Executive Director Sean Stevens:

Wildflower of the Week - Fallen Stars

Oregon White-topped Aster, Aster [Sericocarpus] oregonensis

As late summer begins to advance into fall, one of the most commonly seen wildflowers of the season is the late-blooming Aster. Members of the Sunflower Family, Asteraceae, the Greek word “aster” means “star” in reference to its supposedly star-like flowers.

Wildflower of the Week - a plant with no name

Lilaeopsis occidentalis

Lilaeopsis occidentalis, otherwise known as Western Lilaeopsis, has no special common name - as the common observer may never see its delicately arranged, tiny flowers, or give it much notice at all. Thus, while little noticed or appreciated, I considered it to be a special nymph of streams and other wetland places, where I always greet its unexpected discovery with special warmth and delight!

Mushroom of the Week - an artist's palette

Artist’s Conk, Gandoderma applanatum

Superficially, the Artist’s Conk looks much like last week’s featured bracket fungus species: the Red-belted Conk, Fomitopsis pinicola.  The Artist’s Conk is perhaps only second in abundance to the Red-belt Conk, and has a similar grey, brown to black upper cap surface.

Mushroom of the Week - 'Conked' out

Red-Belted Conk, Fomitopsis (Fomes) pinicola

When the weather turns cold, wet, and even snowy, there is one group of fungi that can always still be found attached to branches and trunks in our Northwest woods.  These are the Polypores—so named for the multitude of tiny pores that release spores from their generally smooth appearing under surfaces.

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