March Wolves and Wildlife Update: It's Complicated

It’s human nature to simplify things. But nature doesn’t always work that way. Our latest wildlife update reinforces the fact that nature is complicated and messy and wonderful.

February Wolf & Wildlife Update: Good News Edition!

There’s plenty of bad news out there. So this month we’re happy to have plenty of good news to share.

January Wolf & Wildlife Update

For the first time in decades, multiple wolves were confirmed on the slopes of Mt. Hood!
There’s never a dull moment when it comes to wolves and wildlife. Let’s dive into our first update of 2018!

Legacy of a Dead Wolf

I love my jobs. Except when I don’t. 

I am privileged to be paid a modest salary fighting for public values that are also my own. My wife and I (mostly my wife) also run a small farm and bed and breakfast in one of the most spectacular landscapes in North America.

Thanks to the wisdom of those who came before us, over one million acres of my county is publicly owned – some of it protected as the Wilderness that it is. I’ve got a pretty good life and a great back yard!

October Wolf and Wildlife Update

Happy Wolf Awareness Week! Hopefully there are opportunities in your community to celebrate the role of wolves as a keystone, iconic species. If there aren’t any coordinated events, perhaps use this week as an opportunity to spend time in nature, exploring the wild landscapes that wolves positively impact.

Friday Trash

Late Friday, the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife issued additional kill orders for wolves. Oregon Wild put out an unequivocal statement, but it looks like we may have taken it too easy on Governor Brown’s agency. 

Nine Things Oregonians Should Know About Forest Fires

Forest fires can be a threat to homes and property, but they also play an important role in restoring and maintaining a healthy forest. Here are nine things every Oregonian should know about forest fires in our area.

Resilience in a Time of Resistance

Connections with people, wild places, and wildlife provide hope in a time of conflict.

Last week, Oregon Wild held our annual staff retreat in the newly expanded Cascade Siskiyou Monument. It’s a beautiful place full of remarkable biodiversity. It is worthy of protection.

As a remote field staffer, it’s always good to reconnect. Our retreats are serious business. But simply being in community with fellow advocates is invigorating and fulfilling. This year though, it was the experience before and the unexpected passenger after that were the most memorable. 

Gone But Not Forgotten - OR4 in NYC

"I Was Wild. They Named Me OR-4" by Ester Curini is inspired by an Oregon Wolf killed in the spring of 2016 and father to OR-7.

By Ester Curini

I am an Italian artist. I live and work in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

Standing Tall by Ester Curini

Poll: Most Oregonians Oppose Hunting of Wolves, Favor Nonlethal Conflict Prevention

A new poll conducted by Mason Dixon Polling and Research finds that the vast majority of Oregon voters — from both rural and urban areas — oppose using hunting as a management tool for wolves in the state and believe wildlife officials wrongly removed state protections from wolves. The poll also revealed that most Oregonians believe nonlethal methods should be the primary focus in reducing conflicts between wolves and livestock. 


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