Oregon Wild's June Webcast Series

Oregon Wild's June Webcast Series

One of the many effects of the COVID pandemic was how it necessitated a different approach to community engagement. The brewfests, street festivals, and other events where we would have an opportunity to interact with supporters or introduce our programs to the public were no longer feasible. 

The Oregon Wild Webcasts series was launched to provide weekly presentations on our state’s wildlands, wildlife, and waters. Not only has this series engaged our existing supporters, but it’s also allowed us to reach new audiences during a time when the protection of our health and communities has necessitated saying home. 

We are excited to return to meeting people face-to-face and celebrating Oregon’s natural wonders together. But, based on the sustaining popularity of our Webcast series, it looks like it is here to stay.

Systemic Racism in Outdoor and Urban Spaces. How Do We Move Forward?
Wednesday, June 17th @ 6PM

To have public lands where everyone is welcome, we also need a just and democratic society where our government, elected leaders, and everyday citizens respect the rights of all people. Join a conversation between Chad Brown of Soul River, James Mills of The Joy Trip Project, Sharon Ross of Afrovivalist, and Richard Thornton, outdoor advocate and activist with over a dozen years in the outdoor industry. 

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Nowheres Wolf: A Stop Motion Film
Tuesday, June 23rd @ 4PM

Join us for a special work-in-progress screening of NOWHERES WOLF, a stop-motion film on the life of wolf OR-7 by artist and filmmaker Suzie Moulton. We'll also take a deeper dive into the fascinating world of stop-motion animation and how you can help. We'll also have a panel discussion on the role of art in activism with our friends at Portland EcoFilm Fest and Crag Law Center.

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Knowing Oregon's Bees
June 24th @ 6 PM

Bee expert August Jackson will present a vividly illustrated exploration of the diversity of Oregon's bee species, their varied life histories, and examples of their relationships with our native flora. Getting to know our native bees is the first step to seeing them everywhere you go, and to appreciating the vital role they play in our ecosystem!

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The Snake River: Hope & Opportunity at the Tipping Point
July 1st @ 6PM

Northeast Oregon is home to America's deepest canyon and the longest recorded habitation by humans. Learn about the importance of the Snake River to indigenous people, wildlife, and generations of battles to protect and restore it from a diverse group of multigenerational advocates.

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