Oregon Wildblog

Webcast: Old-growth forests in Oregon and across the nation

Joan Maloof has likely been to more old-growth forests across the US than anyone alive today. She was so inspired by what she saw in these forests that she founded a national organization to preserve them and help make them accessible for the next generation. From the towering Redwoods of the Oregon and California Coast to the Cypress groves of Florida and the oak forests of New England, Joan will take you on a journey through the incredible differences and striking similarities of the country's remaining ancient forests.

March Wildlife Update: Caught Up and Plugged In

2021 has been a busy year for wildlife advocates in Oregon! Between the state legislature in session, changing of the guard at the Interior Department, litigation, and much more, there’s a lot to tell you about in this month’s wolf pack newsletter.

WOLVES

Let’s start with the bad news first, so that we can end this section on a happy note!

Home is where the fire is

Our reaction to forest fire needs to be more nuanced than just: ”cut and replant.” Burns, it turns out, are actually an opportunity to regenerate a missing component of the spotted owl’s ancestral habitat. 

Webcast: The Tongass National Forest

Learn about the Tongass National Forest - it protects a multitude of fish and wildlife, supports the cultural heritage of indigenous communities, and provides one of the most powerful carbon sinks in the world.

Exploring Oregon's proposed Wild & Scenic Rivers

People enjoy different hikes for different reasons. Some like to get to a summit to enjoy the views, some like wildflower meadows, and others like finding huge trees. Count me in for all of this, but my ideal hike definitely includes both beautiful forests and a free-flowing river or stream (or multiple!) There’s something about how much more lush the vegetation is along a stream, the sound of burbling water as you hike along, or dipping your hands into icy water to splash on your face at a rest stop.