Oregon Wildblog

Featured Hike: Opal Creek

We are excited to be kicking off our summer series of featured hikes! We will be featuring hikes in Oregon’s treasured old growth forests in celebration of our forthcoming hiking guide, Oregon’s Ancient Forests, by our very own Chandra LeGue. We hope these posts will inspire your summer adventures and also give you a little taste of what this comprehensive guidebook has to offer.

Oregon's Lonely Wolverine

Last week, the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest shared remote camera photos of “Stormy,” a wolverine first documented in the NE Oregon forest for the better part of a decade. According to the post from the forest’s Facebook page, Stormy is “recognizable from his unique gular patch, a lighter-colored patch of fur on the throat and chest.”

Corporate Greed and Oregon's Forest Waters

Working in rural communities on the Oregon coast, I spend a lot of time with folks who, like myself, are impacted by the logging industry in many ways. Everyone I work with suffers the negative impacts of logging: Polluted water and reduced streamflows, landslides dumping mud into rivers and smothering fish eggs, and the mass poisoning of native flora and fauna from the sky. These rural communities are left with crumbling roads and schools as the industry has decreased their own taxes and automated as much of their operation as they could. 

Governor Kate Brown Trashes Her Own Wolf Plan

Disappointed and disheartened. Those are the first words that come to mind when I think of the Fish and Wildlife Commission’s decision last Friday to accept ODFW’s indefensible Wolf Plan, affirming what we’ve known for a while: overwhelming public opinion and sound science take a backseat to special interest influence. Unfortunately, it’s Oregon wolves who will pay the ultimate price for this weak management Plan. 

The Stop-Motion Journey of Oregon's Most Famous Wolf

In the fall of 2011, a radio-collared Oregon wolf with the designation OR-7 from the Imnaha Pack in northeast Oregon made history. After an epic journey across the state, the two-year-old male became the first confirmed wolf west of the Cascades since the last wolf bounty had been collected in 1947.

April Wildlife Update: The Political Will

There is definitely no shortage of things going on for Oregon’s wolves and wildlife. This month’s newsletter is a comprehensive look at legislation in Salem affecting wildlife, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s draft wolf management plan, and the latest development from Governor Brown in appointing new members to the state’s Fish and Wildlife Commission. Don’t miss all the ways you can take action to help Oregon’s wildlife!

Unspinning Wolves

The release of ODFW’s annual wolf report is a big deal. As the keepers of the numbers – and keenly interested in public perception – the agency is always sure to give reporters a heads up and ensure their narrative becomes the narrative.

Regardless of the numbers, ODFW tends to paint the rosiest picture they can and are always sure to thank the livestock industry.

Taking Action for Oregon's Forests

Oregon's forests could use a friend right now.

Clearcutting of both private and state forests is at an all-time high. Our drinking water is being polluted. Precious wildlife habitat is being lost. And communities in Oregon’s Coast Range, surrounded on all sides by miles of clearcuts, aren’t being heard by their lawmakers.

Nature for Dummies

Hi there! My name is Rachel Rothman, and I am the Community Outreach and Conservation Advocate intern at the Oregon Wild office in Eugene this winter.

My work here the past three months has centered around environmental policy- forest protection, the wolf plan, aerial spraying, and other conservation issues. But outside of the work I do in the office, the other half of my position has been trying to rally college students to understand and advocate around these causes. What I found? That this is pretty difficult.