Oregon Wildblog

March Wildlife Update: When it Feels Like Groundhog's Day

There’s never a dull day for those of us working on wildlife conservation in Oregon! In this monthly update, we’ll give you the download on the Wolf Plan review process, legislative happenings in Salem, and much more. Also, don’t forget to check out the “In the news” section, as there is one story in particular that really puts a spotlight on the difficulty of doing environmental conservation in this state.

A Forgotten Wolf

Too often, wolves only get attention when they are at the center of unnecessary conflict. Policy and population numbers tend to make up the rest of the story. If there's any "color", it's usually provided by the two-legged characters.

Don’t Be Fooled by “Fake Forests”

by Dominick A. DellaSala, Ph. D, Chief Scientist, Geos Institute

If a tree grows in a forest, does that make it a forest? Does planting trees compensate for cutting down a forest? How do we know we are in a forest or an unreasonable facsimile (“fake”) there of?

A new publication “The World’s Biomes” is set for release in libraries globally in 2020. It will feature my chapter on fake vs. real forests. Contact me at dominick@geosinstitute.org for an advanced copy of this chapter.

A win but not a solution for the Ochoco Mountains

The Bend Source recently published this letter to the editor by Jamie, our Ochoco Mountains Coordinator:

"As the Source recently reported, quiet recreationists across the state rejoiced at the news that a plan proposing 130+ miles of additional off-road vehicle trails in the Ochocos was struck down by the courts. The proposal would have been bad news for wildlife like deer and elk as well as hikers, equestrians, and mountain bikers. 

If Walden wants conservation cred, he has to earn it

If it seems like it has been a decade since Congress did anything good for conservation and the protection of Oregon’s public lands, there’s a reason for that.  Up until this year, 2009 was the last time Congress passed a major piece of Wilderness legislation that benefited special places in Oregon.

 

Withering

by Tom A. Titus

 

A Real Wolf Conservation Plan

What would a real wolf conservation plan look like for Oregon? Certainly not trophy hunting, more conflict, and more dead wolves. Unfortunately, that was the plan Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) officials expected Oregon Wild and other conservation groups to approve this week. While we are still committed to fighting for our state’s fledgling wolf population, Oregon Wild and all our sister groups withdrew from this process rather than rubber stamp an ODFW wolf plan that prioritizes killing over conservation.