Oregon Wildblog

The Stop-Motion Journey of Oregon's Most Famous Wolf

In the fall of 2011, a radio-collared Oregon wolf with the designation OR-7 from the Imnaha Pack in northeast Oregon made history. After an epic journey across the state, the two-year-old male became the first confirmed wolf west of the Cascades since the last wolf bounty had been collected in 1947.

Brewshed Goes to Salem

When we launched the Oregon Brewshed Alliance back in 2015, we were in a pre-Trump world. Sure, we still were staring the climate crisis in the face, but the progressive vibes of the Obama Presidency wrapped us all in a warm blanket of hope - hope that the folks at the top were doing their best to make the world better in all ways. That cozy era allowed those of us privileged enough to feel comfortable in our day-to-day a free pass to complacency.

April Wildlife Update: The Political Will

There is definitely no shortage of things going on for Oregon’s wolves and wildlife. This month’s newsletter is a comprehensive look at legislation in Salem affecting wildlife, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s draft wolf management plan, and the latest development from Governor Brown in appointing new members to the state’s Fish and Wildlife Commission. Don’t miss all the ways you can take action to help Oregon’s wildlife!

Unspinning Wolves

The release of ODFW’s annual wolf report is a big deal. As the keepers of the numbers – and keenly interested in public perception – the agency is always sure to give reporters a heads up and ensure their narrative becomes the narrative.

Regardless of the numbers, ODFW tends to paint the rosiest picture they can and are always sure to thank the livestock industry.

Taking Action for Oregon's Forests

Oregon's forests could use a friend right now.

Clearcutting of both private and state forests is at an all-time high. Our drinking water is being polluted. Precious wildlife habitat is being lost. And communities in Oregon’s Coast Range, surrounded on all sides by miles of clearcuts, aren’t being heard by their lawmakers.

Nature for Dummies

Hi there! My name is Rachel Rothman, and I am the Community Outreach and Conservation Advocate intern at the Oregon Wild office in Eugene this winter.

My work here the past three months has centered around environmental policy- forest protection, the wolf plan, aerial spraying, and other conservation issues. But outside of the work I do in the office, the other half of my position has been trying to rally college students to understand and advocate around these causes. What I found? That this is pretty difficult.

March Wildlife Update: When it Feels Like Groundhog's Day

There’s never a dull day for those of us working on wildlife conservation in Oregon! In this monthly update, we’ll give you the download on the Wolf Plan review process, legislative happenings in Salem, and much more. Also, don’t forget to check out the “In the news” section, as there is one story in particular that really puts a spotlight on the difficulty of doing environmental conservation in this state.

A Forgotten Wolf

Too often, wolves only get attention when they are at the center of unnecessary conflict. Policy and population numbers tend to make up the rest of the story. If there's any "color", it's usually provided by the two-legged characters.

Don’t Be Fooled by “Fake Forests”

by Dominick A. DellaSala, Ph. D, Chief Scientist, Geos Institute

If a tree grows in a forest, does that make it a forest? Does planting trees compensate for cutting down a forest? How do we know we are in a forest or an unreasonable facsimile (“fake”) there of?

A new publication “The World’s Biomes” is set for release in libraries globally in 2020. It will feature my chapter on fake vs. real forests. Contact me at dominick@geosinstitute.org for an advanced copy of this chapter.