19 Oregon Legislators tell ODFW: No Wolf Hunting

Today, the conservation organization Oregon Wild praised a group of 19 state lawmakers who sent letters to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission urging them to reject sport hunting and trapping when revising Oregon’s Wolf management plan.  A proposal has been floated by ODFW staff to create a sport trapping and hunting program for these iconic animals, with just 110 wolves currently known to exist in the entire state.

From the letter:

Oregon’s Wolf Recovery Passes Consequential Threshold

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) shared consequential news that annual wolf counts confirmed at least 7 breeding pairs of wolves in Eastern Oregon for the third consecutive year. Conservationists responded to the news with mixed feelings.

Gone But Not Forgotten - OR4 in NYC

"I Was Wild. They Named Me OR-4" by Ester Curini is inspired by an Oregon Wolf killed in the spring of 2016 and father to OR-7.

By Ester Curini

I am an Italian artist. I live and work in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

Standing Tall by Ester Curini

Journey: One Tale, Two Books

Journey Book Cover (courtesy of Beckie Elgin)

The world's most famous wolf has made it to another historic destination: literature. His story of dispersal from Northeast Oregon to find a mate and traveling over 3,000 miles across the Cascades and into California and back inspired young and old across the globe, including two authors from Oregon and California. You can now bring the story of OR-7 (Journey) into your home with the following beautiful publications.

Teaching the Way of the Wolf

by Joanie Beldin

"In the end, we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we understand, and we will understand only what we are taught." Baba Dioum

Poll: Most Oregonians Oppose Hunting of Wolves, Favor Nonlethal Conflict Prevention

A new poll conducted by Mason Dixon Polling and Research finds that the vast majority of Oregon voters — from both rural and urban areas — oppose using hunting as a management tool for wolves in the state and believe wildlife officials wrongly removed state protections from wolves. The poll also revealed that most Oregonians believe nonlethal methods should be the primary focus in reducing conflicts between wolves and livestock. 

Rogue Pack: The Next Generation

As we've been preparing for this second annual Crater Lake Wolf Rendezvous (learn more here), exciting news came out for wolves in the Crater Lake region. Last week we were introduced to Journey's third litter of Rogue Pack pups, and the newly dubbed Silver Lake wolves, in trail cam photos from the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Oregon Appeals Court Reinstates Legal Challenge to Premature Wolf Delisting

The Oregon Court of Appeals has ruled that Cascadia Wildlands, the Center for Biological Diversity and Oregon Wild can proceed with their legal challenge to the state’s decision to prematurely strip endangered species protections from Oregon’s small population of gray wolves. Fewer than 120 of the animals are known to exist in the state.
 

Public Records Raise Questions About Oregon Governor’s Involvement in Anti-Wolf Bill

A public records request for emails and text messages between the staff of Governor Kate Brown and backers of controversial wolf legislation during the 2016 session appear to contradict claims of her office’s neutrality on the bill.  The messages show that her staff  were heavily involved in the development of the legislation, and worked closely with lobbyists for the livestock industry to push the measure through the Oregon Senate.  

The Political Double-Standard for Wolves

I hope you’ll bear with me for the following hypothetical scenario:

A controversial infrastructure project is being considered by Oregon’s Department of Transportation. There is intense public interest of the project, with 95% of public comments disapproving. While state law requires such projects to be evaluated by an unbiased peer review panel to be improved and revised before submitting to the Transportation Commission for a vote, in the name of political expediency, ODOT bureaucrats sidestep that review process.

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