March Wildlife Update: When it Feels Like Groundhog's Day

There’s never a dull day for those of us working on wildlife conservation in Oregon! In this monthly update, we’ll give you the download on the Wolf Plan review process, legislative happenings in Salem, and much more. Also, don’t forget to check out the “In the news” section, as there is one story in particular that really puts a spotlight on the difficulty of doing environmental conservation in this state.

A Forgotten Wolf

Too often, wolves only get attention when they are at the center of unnecessary conflict. Policy and population numbers tend to make up the rest of the story. If there's any "color", it's usually provided by the two-legged characters.

Bumbling with the Great Old Broads

Closeup bumblebee photo via USDA

Bombus occidentalis is not your typical bee. For starters, unlike the many buzzing pollinators I observe in my organic yard or on the wildflowers lining the many trails I've hiked over the past year, I've never seen a Western bumblebee. And, while many of our native pollinators are in decline for a variety of reasons, this Bombus is especially rare.

Lawsuit Challenges Oregon’s Denial of Full Protection for Marbled Murrelets

Five conservation groups filed a lawsuit today against the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Commission for failing to uplist the marbled murrelet from threatened to endangered under the Oregon Endangered Species Act.  

Nine Things Oregonians Should Know About Forest Fires

Forest fires can be a threat to homes and property, but they also play an important role in restoring and maintaining a healthy forest. Here are nine things every Oregonian should know about forest fires in our area.

State Endangered Species Protection Sought for Oregon’s Humboldt Martens

Six conservation groups filed a petition today asking the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to protect the Humboldt marten under the Oregon Endangered Species Act. 

Only two populations of fewer than 200 total animals currently survive in the state, on the central and southern coast. Recent studies project that the rare carnivores could go extinct in Oregon if they do not get protection. 

June Wildlife Update: Sea Otter Sighting, Crater Lake Wolf Rendezvous, and More!

There’s still time to sign up for the Crater Lake Wolf Rendezvous! The 4-day, 3-night trip, September 13-16, will take you to the incomparable landscapes around Oregon's only national park. We'll visit portions of Oregon Wild's 500,000-acre Crater Lake Wilderness proposal including the headwaters of one of Oregon's most iconic rivers: the Wild Rogue.

 

The tentative schedule includes meetings with wolf biologists, naturalists, and local wildlife advocates, possibly a tracking or outdoor skills workshop, scenic drives, and short hikes throughout the area. Get your spot before it’s too late.

May Wildlife Update: The Latest on the Pine Creek Pack

Wolverines, marbled murrelets, and red tree voles--oh my! In this month’s update, be sure to check out the wildlife section (in addition to the wolf section) as lots of things have been happening for Oregon’s threatened, endangered, and recovering native wildlife species. 

Spring Cleaning

This is the third in a series of blogs highlighting the stories behind the stories of “wolf conservation” under Curt Melcher and Governor Brown’s Department of Fish and Wildlife.

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